amest i bovvered, forsooth?

googlebus:

hey does this dick in my mouth make me look gay?

9 hours ago via obichan (originally googlebus)

saydolly:

Aziz Ansari is like the king of callouts.

(Source: renloras)

4thalbum:

"all gays will go to hell"

oh noooo…. what will i do… surrounded with ……. nothing ……. but other homosexuals……….. u win this round……… god

stunningpicture:

I work with comedians

stunningpicture:

I work with comedians

heyreallygiger:

if i ever met satan the first thing i would say is “did it hurt…when you fell from heaven??” It would be hilarious. The next thing I would do is probably burst into flame and get impaled dozens of times but it would still be hilarious

(Source: slaphat)

9 hours ago via dejayvu (originally slaphat)

transitiontransmission:

MTV and Logo will premiere Laverne Cox Presents: The T Word, a documentary following seven transgender youths and the issues they face.

On October 17, MTV and Logo will simultaneously premiere “Laverne Cox Presents: The T Word,” a documentary produced by “Orange Is the New Black” cast member Laverne Cox. The hour-long documentary follows the lives of seven transgender youths. They hail from New York, New Orleans and Baltimore and range in age from 12 to 24 years old, but they share common obstacles and joys.

Cox, an activist for transgender issues as well as an actress, also acts as host for the documentary, walking viewers through the difficulties of coming out, how race plays into the equation, bullying, violence and familial and social support.

Viewers will meet Kye, a Brooklyn man who was the first transgender Division I basketball player ever, as well as college freshman Ari, an 18-year-old man taking his first steps into campus life. Zoey, a 12-year-old navigating life at her new school in California after school administrators refused to acknowledge her as a girl, is also featured, among other true life stories.

After the documentary’s premiere, Logo and MTV.com will host an hour-long “Trans Forum,” hosted by Cox and SuChin Pak. Alongside the subjects of the documentary, Cox will field questions from audience members and those tuning in via social media.

The documentary was produced as part of MTV’s Look Different campaign, a multi-year initiative to identify and fight biases, whether they be based in gender, sexual orientation or race.

“Laverne Cox Presents: The T Word” will air on October 17 and 7 p.m. ET.

clittered:

holy shit

(Source: sandandglass)

partyymonsterr:

His special attack is windmill.

partyymonsterr:

His special attack is windmill.

(Source: best-of-imgur)

theponderingponds:

conorayne:

josiephone:

alwaysactually:

lusilly:

some muggleborn like “i want to be an astronaut when i grow up!”

wizard kids like “wtf is an astronaut”

"oh you know…the people who go to the moon"

implying that magical children would know literally nothing outside of the wizarding worldimage



image

and he was supposed to be the expert

(Source: lusilly2)

10 hours ago via suspectatom (originally lusilly2)

"For the record, feminism by definition is: ‘The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.’
I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and, unattractive.
Why is the word such an uncomfortable one?”

"For the record, feminism by definition is: ‘The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.’

I started questioning gender-based assumptions when at eight I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not.

When at 14 I started being sexualized by certain elements of the press.

When at 15 my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.”

When at 18 my male friends were unable to express their feelings.

I decided I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, anti-men and, unattractive.

Why is the word such an uncomfortable one?”

(Source: holandroden)